Work Ethic

MENOMINEE – My son and a local businesswoman inspired me to write this article because of what they have seen and experienced from teens and high school graduates seeking employment. In the course of writing this article several other persons have shared their experiences Our discussions centered on the topic of work ethics.

Oftentimes, they have heard the following comments:

“Why is Jane (not her real name) making more than me?” (Jane has been working there for 10 years?)

“What, I have to work two jobs?”

“I applied to wait on tables, not clean the dining room.”

“Why do I have to work on weekends/afternoons or holidays?”

“I have to start work at 5 a.m.?”

“I deserve this job.”

For those who have made the statements above, or are in agreement, you are in for one rude awakening. You will not find any employment. This nation was built on freedom, hard work, and sacrifice. By “hard work,” that means doing whatever it takes to accomplish any job to the best of your ability. It is about sacrifice and taking one, two, or even three jobs, just to get by, if you are living on your own.

Our country does not guarantee jobs that you will find satisfying, or that will match your qualifications. It does provide opportunities for people to work. I stress the word, opportunities. They may not align with your personal preferences, but they may be a means to an end. My own personal experience dovetails with this statement, as my first job was cleaning the restrooms at a local county campground.

For example, positive previous work experiences can be added to your resume, and could elevate you above other job applicants for the same position. However, if one is too selective about jobs, a golden opportunity to work could pass you by.

Another part of this process is the application. I realize that many applications are sent via the Internet, but there are still jobs that require you to submit an application in person or by mail.

Here are some tips to use when turning in your application in person: be properly dressed, groomed, pleasant, and avoid slang and vulgar language. Some applicants may believe that it is within their rights to dress and act how they want. Understand, it is the employer’s right to hire who they want. If you do not follow the previous tips, chances are slim to none that you will be hired

The employers are doing you a favor by hiring you. Remember, any job is better than no job.

Dan Paul is a retired school administrator. His columns, which explore family relationships, are published monthly in Lifestyles.